Author: <span class="vcard">admin</span>

Admin

As I write, it is less than 48 hours until my own Jeopardy! experience reaches air.  Many of you may have been laughing along with that Hometown Howdy of mine.

 

…..grrr.  That’s a hard line to say!  Despite being on national TV (- and writing blog posts about it – ) – ( – and gabbing to every local news media outlet – ), I don’t think it’s crazy to say that I’m not one for self-promotion.  Now that the freshmen found it, and I have to hear the Howdy thirty times a day, with imitation – well, it gets me.

I’ve been really enjoying my Jeopardy! viewing this week.  If I haven’t said it enough, the entire team behind the scenes and in front of the camera made the experience the friendliest, if still anxious, of my endeavors.  Each of the contestants were top notch.  Even if it doesn’t show (with all the negative numbers and single-game dominance), everybody deserved to be there and would have/could have won if categories or buzzers had been more in their timing.

Dash it all!

Crazy to think that I’m in that room on the air, just not visible yet.  It’s like listening to an echo, or swimming through an oft-watched episode of Twilight Zone – you know all the lines to but still have to catch yourself to see if really happened just like that.  Each promo and each clue is another knock, another footstep, another thunderbolt to the half hour that has been in the back of my mind for three months.  I hope that everyone who tunes in will play along and join me in giggling through the whole show.  While I certainly didn’t make enough money to take “rich leave”, I’m not disappointed with my performance.  It’s been a privilege and quite the honor.  I couldn’t have done it without Shannon and without the support of my colleagues, students, and friends.  Sincerely, thank you!

Managed to resist “Celebrity Jeopardy!”/Kebert Xela joke. #meetyourheroes

The End….For now?

So long everybody!

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        Be’er preperred

Up in the Morning Early

Cauld blaws the wind frae east to west,
The drift is driving sairly;
Sae loud and shrill’s I hear the blast,
I’m sure it’s winter fairly.

Up in the morning’s no for me,
Up in the morning early;
When a’ the hills are cover’d wi’ snaw,
I’m sure its winter fairly.

The birds sit chittering in the thorn,
A’ day they fare but sparely;
And lang’s the night frae e’en to morn,
I’m sure it’s winter fairly.

Up in the morning’s no for me,
Up in the morning early;
When a’ the hills are cover’d wi’ snaw,
I’m sure its winter fairly.

– Robert Burns

        Dedication of the Robert Burns statue in Cheyenne, Wyoming, on November 11, 1929

12th Grade: European Literature Threads

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Women are awesome!  Some people aren’t aware, apparently.  With today’s redux of the women’s marches across the nation (and perhaps the world!).  It wouldn’t be a bad thing at all if someday we can collectively remember that history has been made by women, too – so you can do your part by checking out the titles below!

The Princess and the Pony. Kate Beaton. Arthur A. Levine Books. 2015.
The Princess and the Pony. Kate Beaton. Arthur A. Levine Books. 2015.

Kate Beaton is the magnificent wit behind the webcomic series Hark! A Vagrant, which has been printed in a few best-selling books (and also isn’t appropriate for all ages, especially because some killjoys detest constant giggling).  The Princess and the Pony, great for kids and adults, tells the story of Princess Pinecone, who wants a noble warhorse to ride into Viking-style violence.  For her birthday she gets instead a flatulent, rotund pony.  What happens next is funny and feminist.  Available from Scholastic Book Orders for $4!

Rad American Women A-Z. Kate Schatz & Miriam Klein Stahl. City Lights. 2015.
Rad American Women A-Z. Kate Schatz & Miriam Klein Stahl. City Lights. 2015.

Revolution begins at home!  America may be relatively young on the world stage, but its women have radically changed history.  The 26 women profiled in this book represent science, entertainment, athletics, innovation, exploration – basically all the walks of life that make our country what it is.  Kate Schatz writes the profiles, and Miriam Klein Stahl provides each illustration.  Available from Scholastic for $7, this pocket-sized guide is perfect for bite-sized, yet larger-than-life, world-widening.

Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science - and the World. Rachel Swaby. Broadway Books. 2015.
Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science – and the World. Rachel Swaby. Broadway Books. 2015.

Rachel Swaby was inspired to write this informative, invigorating collection of women inventors, scientists, and explorers after seeing too many get short shrift in their obituaries.  Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron’s daughter and – more importantly – the world’s first computer programmer (in the 1840s!), is included.  As is Hedy Lamarr, scintillating movie star and also pioneer in radar technology.  And those are just the most famous faces.  This book captures the sentiment of the women’s history movement succinctly: the stories have been there all along, but someone *forgot* to tell the whole truth.  We owe it to ourselves to fix that.  Read well – it’s the best provision for changing your life.

Reading Picks Threads

Christmas Memories
Christmas Memories

The number one request in wishlists sent to Mr. Earnshaw’s North Pole Classroom Blog?  More videos from Bob’s Buskers (from Bob’s Burgers)!  So here you go – the National, a Christmas Tree, and a message we can all get behind.  Stay warm, students and friends; happy holidays!

Admin Threads

“Hello, world!”  That’s the sign-on now famous, or infamous, to CS50x students who bump into such messages in their adventures through coding.  We’ve been working on completing the rigorous course requirements in Scratch, C, computational thinking, and algorithmic problem solving, with more to come before the early-December end-date.  Add to that the Google Classroom transition and WebQuests, TurnItIn, and Voicethread projects, and it’s not hard to see that September was a digital dive.  As such, this corner of the internet has gotten a little dusty, for which I apologize – if anybody but me pays much attention at all!

As a small sampling of my work in the course, and as a convenient segue into freshmen short stories and senior Old and Middle English, here’s a recording of my Scratch fable.  Deep thoughts there.  Follow the link to fall into fable (as 30 sec clip)!

The Bat and Crab at the Garden Gate

Thanks, and here’s hoping for an awesome October!

Admin Threads

Thank you so much, students, who have already signed up for Remind and other digital class notifications.  Today would’ve been the first day of school, but the powers that be wisely moved it to the side so that the real show – Total Solar Eclipse! – can take center stage.  I’m looking forward to seeing all of you tomorrow, and many of you on today’s Eclipse field trip, to start the academic year!

Diagram of a solar eclipse from a 13th-century illuminated manuscript. The New York Public Library Digital Collections – via BrainPickings

Those of you on the bus today will have hours to be regaled with eclipse myths, like the frogs who swallow the stars, or passages from Annie Dillard’s classic essay on 1979’s offering, or even jam out to Mr. E’s favorite eclipse playlists.

Space.com has the broadest collection, in my opinion:

If you won’t be on our trip, please make an effort on your own to see what Mabel Loomis Todd observed as: “A vast, palpable presence overwhelming the world. The blue sky changes to gray or dull purple, speedily becoming more dusky, and a death-like trance seizes upon everything earthly.”

Grab those special, approved viewers’ glasses and maybe read up on some of the political and cultural impacts of this eclipse in a particularly dramatic moment in American history at The Atlantic.

You should make every effort to live in this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, what Emily Dickinson, who saw the eclipse in 1875, immortalized in the lines:

It sounded as if the streets were running —
And then — the streets stood still —
Eclipse was all we could see at the Window
And Awe — was all we could feel.

By and by — the boldest stole out of his Covert
To see if Time was there —
Nature was in her Opal Apron —
Mixing fresher Air.

Happy stargazing!

See you soon.

-Mr. E

Admin Field Trips Playlists Threads

Can you believe it?!  Not much sense in thinking backwards now – so let’s go ahead and get started!  Here is the welcome back slideshow that would normally air in the Back to School evening event.  I will be absent this go ’round, attending an audition for Jeopardy! in Denver, which will hopefully look something nothing like this:

via GIPHY

In lieu of the in-person slideshow, here is a digital copy.  For syllabi, Remind flyers, and other info, head into the Class Resources tabs featured along the bar at the top.

Thanks for visiting, and happy school year!

Admin Class Resources

Admin