Category: Class Resources

Can you believe it?!  Not much sense in thinking backwards now – so let’s go ahead and get started!  Here is the welcome back slideshow that would normally air in the Back to School evening event.  I will be absent this go ’round, attending an audition for Jeopardy! in Denver, which will hopefully look something nothing like this:

via GIPHY

In lieu of the in-person slideshow, here is a digital copy.  For syllabi, Remind flyers, and other info, head into the Class Resources tabs featured along the bar at the top.

Thanks for visiting, and happy school year!

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Admin Class Resources

Image from Eclectic/Eccentric.
Image from Eclectic/Eccentric.

The Odyssey is one of the earliest, and best, works in the “big trip” portrayal, so grand they named half the genre after it!

Your explorations are also pretty grand, as long as you are choosing the path that best fits your kleos and nostos.  The most recent post on this topic gave you some resources on Odyssey summaries and visual-friendly breakdowns.  I’m happy to provide more study sites for you, from the British Museum and also from an esteemed Duke prof.

British Museum and British Library...can you survive on these alone? Probably worth it.
British Museum and British Library…can you survive on these alone? Probably worth it.

There are, of course, versions on YouTube, including SparkNotes and Thug Notes (discretion still advised), as well as the 1997 Hallmark movie version and even a Crash Course analysis!

There are even special resources for those freshmen looking to complete a Map for their Odyssey project, here are a few tips:

First – the in-class map is by no means definitive, but has two components that I think are key: an oversized Ithaca and an Underworld far (far) to the west.  You don’t have to reach the Pillars of Heracles, but I like the idea of going to the edge of the known (Mediterranean) world.

Second – use your resources to help you tell the story!  Some of my favorites are on Google Earth (download it if you haven’t – it’s worth it!), especially the Odyssey on Google Lit Trips, which features facts and artwork at the locations in each episode.  Your map doesn’t need to be overly complicated, but consider adding stickers, flags, or figures to keep the travels alive.

Third – you don’t need to use salt dough, but this is a straightforward method to make your map 3D that is both easy and useful!  The video below was made in jazzy style by a very good friend of mine some years ago, and gives you a nice breakdown of the salt dough process.  I definitely expect your map to be in color, so grab the appropriate food coloring to go with it or paint it after it dries (a few days later)!

For Glory!

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9th Grade: Intro to Literature Class Resources

Looking down on her favorite mortal
Looking down with muse in ‘er eye

Odyssey season is upon us!  Unless you too want to wander around the rocky islands of 9th Grade trying to get home, you would do well to heed our Olympian decree to keep up with the readings and get that final project done.

For the (24!) books of the epic, you have plenty of resources in getting the gist of the plot so you can focus more on our essential questions and archetypes.  So, as the grey-eyed one provided Odysseus the tools he needed to be successful, this post is Part I of our mission to get you out of here in one, sophomoric, piece.

Besides the class books and graphic novels/comics, check out these links to get your Mentor on!

Traditional guides: the safety net of Sparknotes and the too-cool-for-school ethos of Shmoop (which has some funny infographics peppered throughout, and way too many popups…)

I ain't saying that they're bronzediggers...
I ain’t saying that they’re bronzediggers…

Full-text versions of the epic: including Ian Johnston’s recent translation out of Vancouver Island University, and two prose translations, old (A.T. Murray) and older (Samuel Butler).

Anyone seen that mortal I was tormenting? Oh well - plenty to choose from.
Anyone seen that mortal I was tormenting? Oh well –
plenty to choose from.

And some really interesting new-media options: including some open/ed. designs from our community of Padlet (this one’s Verity Webster’s) and a fascinating, and highly distracting, clickable offering from Emery University’s Carlos Museum.  Clicking on the Greece tab will take you to the interactive site (Flash required).

It will prove itself even to you doubters.
It will prove itself even to you doubters.

Of course, we have the in-class options, but the Odyssey is one of the biggest stories ever told!  You should journey onto the kool-aid seas of the internet to get the best version for you.

KLEOS/NOSTOS!

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9th Grade: Intro to Literature Class Resources

                Walt Whitman. Poets.org

“Poets to Come (Leaves of Grass.90)”

by Walt Whitman, (1819-1892)

Poets to come!  orators, singers, musicians to come!

Not to-day is to justify me and answer what I am for,

But you, a new brood, native, athletic, continental,

greater than before known,

Arouse!  for you must justify me!

I myself but write one or two indicative words for the

future,

I but advance a moment only to wheel and hurry back

in the darkness.

 

I am a man who, sauntering along without fully

stopping, turns a casual look upon you and then

averts his face,

Leaving it to you to prove and define it,

Expecting the main things from you.

#pocketpoem   #ThankYouNEA

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Kitchener, from: 'Your country needs you' advertisement in London Opinion, Vol. XLII No.546, 5 September 1914. British Library.
Kitchener, from: ‘Your country needs you’ advertisement in London Opinion, Vol. XLII No.546, 5 September 1914. British Library.

The following links are for the 1st and 4th Hour British Literature classes, but anyone should feel free to follow them to education (or emptiness).  It may be said that no retelling can ever truly capture the horrors and mindset of warfare.  But artists and authors have to try – sometimes only poetry or paint can communicate the senses and worst fears made real.

WNB#1/2 URLs:

World War Pictures hosts a variety of visual media pertaining to the conflicts: http://www.world-war-pictures.com/

The British Library, again, gives us great multimedia and perspectives on our class content.  The first link, on propaganda, should be used to answer prompt 13.  The second link is extra reading, if you are looking for more perspective on the poems for your posters.

http://www.bl.uk/world-war-one/themes/propaganda

http://www.bl.uk/world-war-one/articles/reframing-first-world-war-poetry 

If you are curious, you could also follow-up with two perspectives on the ubiquity of the “Keep Calm and Carry On” slogan, by Dr. Henry Irving and Owen Hatherley, respectively.

The US National Archives has a YouTube playlist of war films from 100 years ago:

Finally (because why not), here is a trench game from the UK’s National Archives.

Hurrah for the Scarlet and the Blue, and may we never again find ourselves in a war to end all wars.

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12th Grade: European Literature Class Resources Threads

9th Grade: Intro to Literature Class Resources

Violent delights have violent ends!
Violent delights have violent ends!

Romeo and Juliet is finally here!  I wanted to share a few wonderful resources to keep you on track during our reading, including a few winners from last year’s Shakespeare’s World Research presentations (hint hint).  As you may remember, there is a veritable slew (slew!) of information to keep track of.  It’s all worth it though!  Remember, we don’t agree with Plato – art isn’t useless!  Look at what Lady Gaga pulled off in yesterday’s Super Bowl:

Theatrical skills can really pay off later!  These great four links help fill in general knowledge of Shakespeare’s life and works.  Also, although it’s a little early to be thinking about it, you can expect some potential Unit Test items below…

Here’s a link to a brief timeline of the life of Stratford’s most famous son:

http://www.earlyshakespeare.com/images/Timeline.pdf


This YouTube video takes a humorous look at introducing Shakespeare (make sure you stick around until the ironic, slow open is over):


Of course, here’s the Canadian Folio copy of the play we use in class:

http://www.canadianshakespeares.ca/folio/folio.html


And, because why not, more awesomeness relating to the Bard from a 2012 TEDxTalk:

The Readiness is All!

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9th Grade: Intro to Literature Class Resources

Dream job - making high-quality educational websites.  Also, having likeness preserved on a jar.
Dream job – making high-quality educational websites. Also, having likeness preserved on a jar.

Freshmen!  Welcome to theater.  We begin this week in, er, the Beginning!  The Ancient Greeks are credited with the invention of modern theater, and you are learning all about ’em this week through the City Dionysia packet.  To complete the prompts, visit the most excellent resource of ARTSEDGE, the Education in Arts wing of the Kennedy Center.

Visit the site, which opens up in your first section: Prologue.

http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/interactives/greece/theater/prologue.html

Due at the end of the week, this is your first chance in Semester 2 to earn KLEOS – TO GLORY!

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9th Grade: Intro to Literature Class Resources

A new week, a new unit!  Now, I know all of you loved Macbeth ever so much (almost at dashing-brains-on-the-floor levels), but it’s time to move into our needlessly overpacked third unit — the Enlightenment, Restoration, and Romantic Eras in 6 weeks or less!

As promised, I have included today’s content-opening overview so that you may review the years, terms, and personalities that you might explore in your Unit Projects.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Huzzah!

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12th Grade: European Literature Class Resources

Hey, hey Wednesday!  I’ll be brief, as your Remind text probably sent you here while you should be getting ready for school.  Skim through these notes while you slug that skim milk.

Just kidding – no one should drink skim milk:

I know what I'm about.
I know what I’m about, son.

9th: Important goings on in class today!  But first: Werewolf socks!

What happens in Vegas...causes people to head back home as cursed, but fashionable, monsters.
What happens in Vegas…causes people to head back home as cursed, but fashionable, monsters.

Okay, now that that’s covered – your own Wolf Week continues in class today, involving group collaboration to synthesize (Vocab! see the board’s Thinking Strategy poster) some article pieces from the Casper Star Tribune in 2015.

Gray Area: Twenty years after wolves were released into the wild

There are photos and links to help each group, but especially pertaining to those of you in Group 3 for the Timeline, which has a much larger version available through the article.

12th: It’s your final official work day for Unit 1 Projects, so make some magic happen!  Or else.

Poof goes your grade.
Poof goes your grade.

1010: Today’s the day for your Town Hall! Unless you want to do it tomorrow.  Whatever works – it’s your class.  Just live in that character card, keep your manners clean, and don’t be throwing anything besides carefully considered arguments and objections.

It's all good fun till someone loses a pie. Ooh! Or, don't use any custwords (Get it? Cuss words and custards? Ha. Punny.)
It’s all good fun till someone loses a pie.
Ooh! Or, don’t use any custwords (Get it? Cuss words and custards? Ha. Punny.)

 

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9th Grade: Intro to Literature Admin Class Resources Field Trips Monsters