Category: Monsters

Hey, hey Wednesday!  I’ll be brief, as your Remind text probably sent you here while you should be getting ready for school.  Skim through these notes while you slug that skim milk.

Just kidding – no one should drink skim milk:

I know what I'm about.
I know what I’m about, son.

9th: Important goings on in class today!  But first: Werewolf socks!

What happens in Vegas...causes people to head back home as cursed, but fashionable, monsters.
What happens in Vegas…causes people to head back home as cursed, but fashionable, monsters.

Okay, now that that’s covered – your own Wolf Week continues in class today, involving group collaboration to synthesize (Vocab! see the board’s Thinking Strategy poster) some article pieces from the Casper Star Tribune in 2015.

Gray Area: Twenty years after wolves were released into the wild

There are photos and links to help each group, but especially pertaining to those of you in Group 3 for the Timeline, which has a much larger version available through the article.

12th: It’s your final official work day for Unit 1 Projects, so make some magic happen!  Or else.

Poof goes your grade.
Poof goes your grade.

1010: Today’s the day for your Town Hall! Unless you want to do it tomorrow.  Whatever works – it’s your class.  Just live in that character card, keep your manners clean, and don’t be throwing anything besides carefully considered arguments and objections.

It's all good fun till someone loses a pie. Ooh! Or, don't use any custwords (Get it? Cuss words and custards? Ha. Punny.)
It’s all good fun till someone loses a pie.
Ooh! Or, don’t use any custwords (Get it? Cuss words and custards? Ha. Punny.)

 

9th Grade: Intro to Literature Admin Class Resources Field Trips Monsters

Woot!  Made it in one piece.  I trust that your Monday was most marvelous, even if you had to go a whole day without my judgmental, raised eyebrow.

Before the reminders, just a note – please feel free to reach out to me this week through the school e-mail or the Remind App.  As I warned you, I will be away from grading this week, but I can still hear your questions, updates, and arguments as to why you should get extra credit/Vegas goodies/Time and Space considerations, etc.

On to your shameless check-ins!

9th: Did you enjoy Peter and the Wolf?!  I love it.  Make sure your Viewer’s Guide notes are in by the end of the week, or else you’ll be seeing this face when I get back in.

The stare already lives in your nightmares.
The stare already lives in your nightmares.

12th: How did I miss this opportunity last week in our Arthurian adventures?!

Maybe it fits into your Unit 1 Project on the cultural legacy of Arthur in British Literature.  Or you can just get Guy Richie’s Sherlock Holmes treatment on this year too, in pre-medieval times.  With monsters!

1010: Is the snark boiling over in class yet this week?!  Keep it respectful, but get ready to amp up your character cards in that Town Hall.  For some additional help, here’s a link to the original article’s comment section on The Atlantic.  Maybe you’ll get some good arguments to try in class!  I haven’t previewed them all of course, so I do not condone any comments by trolls you may find.

Not those kinds. Avoid these too.
Not these kinds.  Avoid these too.

Read Neil Gaiman’s Troll Bridge instead.  Read anything by Neil Gaiman.  Everything.

That’s it!  Stay tuned for tomorrow, and keep at it!

Admin Field Trips Monsters Reading Picks

Field Trips Monsters

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.  Seth Grahame-Smith.  Quirk Classics.  2009.
Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Seth Grahame-Smith. Quirk Classics. 2009.

Ah, February.  For many, the month brings to mind snowdrifts, Valentines, and the peculiarity of a short month made a little longer every four years.  But for others, February is about a different kind of romance – the marriage of classic literature and “ultraviolent zombie mayhem”. To wit, 2013 offered Warm Bodies, a film – based on a book – based on Romeo and Juliet (plus zombies).  This Friday marks the release of an undead, overdue film – based on a book – that may have started it all: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.  While the film itself should be a delight (for those who like proper English ladies unsheathing decapitations upon dreadful Satan-spawn), the source material is not to be missed either.

Written by Seth Grahame-Smith (who also penned Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter), this novel comes from one of my favorite publishers Quirk Books, purveyor of all things interesting, literary, and, well, quirky (see: William Shakespeare’s Star WarsMiss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, and Horrorstör, to name a few).  Although eminently readable for its funniness and formally choreographed carnage, the genius behind PPZ is its authenticity in tone to Jane Austen’s 1813 original.  The manners and style that so occupy the Bennet sisters are retained, only now the ladies must sharpen swords and their martial arts skills in addition to proper dance form and social etiquette.  Also, the addition of “the dreadfuls” may clarify, for modern readers, some of the context and inferred elements of the novel, adding an undead focus.

p. 15 - "Mr. Darcy watched Elizabeth and her sisters work their way outward, beheading zombie after zombie as they went."  Illustrations by Philip Smiley.
p. 15 – “Mr. Darcy watched Elizabeth and her sisters work their way outward, beheading zombie after zombie as they went.” Illustrations by Philip Smiley.

The zombie trend, in my opinion, may have largely run its course.  Walking undead, such as vampires and zombies, aren’t really my thing, at least.  However, there is an undeniable appeal in the zeitgeist in imagining an endless horde of mindless consumers slowly, but surely, eroding the fabric of society.  Perhaps it was the same in Regency England!  If you can’t beat ’em, eat ’em…er, join ’em.  For Brit. Lit. students, please consider PPZ as an option for the Unit 4 novels (or seek out sequels and spinoffs such as Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters or Android Karenina). There may also be an extra credit opportunity for using the movie as an excuse to get literary – as if you needed one!

Monsters Reading Picks