Tag Archives: British Lit.

World War Poetry Posters

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Kitchener, from: 'Your country needs you' advertisement in London Opinion, Vol. XLII No.546, 5 September 1914. British Library.

Kitchener, from: ‘Your country needs you’ advertisement in London Opinion, Vol. XLII No.546, 5 September 1914. British Library.

The following links are for the 1st and 4th Hour British Literature classes, but anyone should feel free to follow them to education (or emptiness).  It may be said that no retelling can ever truly capture the horrors and mindset of warfare.  But artists and authors have to try – sometimes only poetry or paint can communicate the senses and worst fears made real.

WNB#1/2 URLs:

World War Pictures hosts a variety of visual media pertaining to the conflicts: http://www.world-war-pictures.com/

The British Library, again, gives us great multimedia and perspectives on our class content.  The first link, on propaganda, should be used to answer prompt 13.  The second link is extra reading, if you are looking for more perspective on the poems for your posters.

http://www.bl.uk/world-war-one/themes/propaganda

http://www.bl.uk/world-war-one/articles/reframing-first-world-war-poetry 

If you are curious, you could also follow-up with two perspectives on the ubiquity of the “Keep Calm and Carry On” slogan, by Dr. Henry Irving and Owen Hatherley, respectively.

The US National Archives has a YouTube playlist of war films from 100 years ago:

Finally (because why not), here is a trench game from the UK’s National Archives.

Hurrah for the Scarlet and the Blue, and may we never again find ourselves in a war to end all wars.

12th – Invitations into Victorian Era Culture!

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Welcome back students!  Distract yourself from the hazardous, wintry roads with some travels in time-and-space!

Your adventures ask you to follow the invitation drawn in class, and then head to the suggested sites to learn all you can about that aspect of Victorian Life.

The two sites recommended for each invitation come to us from dedicated professionals and amateurs alike.

The first is a major authority – the British Library’s Romantic and Victorian collection: https://www.bl.uk/romantics-and-victorians

If you could be trusted to self-motivate, this  site would be your teacher.

If you could be trusted to self-motivate, this site would be your teacher.

The second demonstrates the collective scholastic innovation of dedicated lovers of lit: the Victorian Web: http://www.victorianweb.org/

The Web will be significant in Great Expectations, not least of which in building expectations that are great.

The Web will be significant in Great Expectations, not least of which in building expectations that are great.

The other sites, based upon your subject, could include:

the BALL:

https://janeaustensworld.wordpress.com/

the NATURE WALK:

https://vqronline.org/nature-loving-victorians

the ANATOMY LECTURE:

http://www.pbs.org/opb/historydetectives/feature/body-snatching-around-the-world/

the COURT:

http://vcp/e2bn.org/justice/

the GOVERNESS:

http://web.utk.edu/~gerard/romanticpolitics/governess.html

the GRAND TOUR:

https://janeaustensworld.wordpress.com/2008/04/14/the-grand-tour-in-the-18th-19th-century/

the NEWSPAPER:

http://find.galegroup.com/bncn/BNCN_researchguide.htm

the CARRIAGE:

https://www.ourcivilisation.com/smartboard/shop/bynpwllr/coaches2.htm

British Lit. – Unit 3 Overview

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A new week, a new unit!  Now, I know all of you loved Macbeth ever so much (almost at dashing-brains-on-the-floor levels), but it’s time to move into our needlessly overpacked third unit — the Enlightenment, Restoration, and Romantic Eras in 6 weeks or less!

As promised, I have included today’s content-opening overview so that you may review the years, terms, and personalities that you might explore in your Unit Projects.

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Huzzah!

Mr. E is Missing! (But he has the technology.) Part 2 from the Faraway.

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Woot!  Made it in one piece.  I trust that your Monday was most marvelous, even if you had to go a whole day without my judgmental, raised eyebrow.

Before the reminders, just a note – please feel free to reach out to me this week through the school e-mail or the Remind App.  As I warned you, I will be away from grading this week, but I can still hear your questions, updates, and arguments as to why you should get extra credit/Vegas goodies/Time and Space considerations, etc.

On to your shameless check-ins!

9th: Did you enjoy Peter and the Wolf?!  I love it.  Make sure your Viewer’s Guide notes are in by the end of the week, or else you’ll be seeing this face when I get back in.

The stare already lives in your nightmares.

The stare already lives in your nightmares.

12th: How did I miss this opportunity last week in our Arthurian adventures?!

Maybe it fits into your Unit 1 Project on the cultural legacy of Arthur in British Literature.  Or you can just get Guy Richie’s Sherlock Holmes treatment on this year too, in pre-medieval times.  With monsters!

1010: Is the snark boiling over in class yet this week?!  Keep it respectful, but get ready to amp up your character cards in that Town Hall.  For some additional help, here’s a link to the original article’s comment section on The Atlantic.  Maybe you’ll get some good arguments to try in class!  I haven’t previewed them all of course, so I do not condone any comments by trolls you may find.

Not those kinds. Avoid these too.

Not these kinds.  Avoid these too.

Read Neil Gaiman’s Troll Bridge instead.  Read anything by Neil Gaiman.  Everything.

That’s it!  Stay tuned for tomorrow, and keep at it!

Banned Books Week 2016

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Banned Books Week 2015, courtesy ala.org/bbooks

Banned Books Week 2015, courtesy ala.org/bbooks

Every year, the last week in September becomes the focal point for a concerted effort to celebrate the freedom to read.  In this country, the First Amendment’s right to free speech must contend with a long history of censorship – promoted by individuals, organizations, and government.  Banned Books Week is organized by the American Library Association (ALA), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and a host of non-profits, publishers, and legal defense funds.  It is supported by myself, among much of the reading world, and, through this week’s Extra Credit opportunity, by you!

(Check out this cool infographic to learn more: courtesy of Electric Literature)

To receive Extra Credit for Banned Books Week, you must choose one of the following options, and use professional images, symbols, designs, or media:

A) Create a Poster to celebrate the week, using the three requirements below:

B) Create a Handout to share information about banned and challenged books, using these criteria:

  • A list of frequently challenged books (Here’s a resource from the ALA)
  • Reasons why books are often challenged (Resources from the Huffington Post, in 2012 and 2014)
  • A checklist of frequently challenged books – check off as many as you’ve read!

C) Compose a 1 page essay (typed – 12pt font, TNR, double-spaced) on To Kill a Mockingbird as a challenged book.  Why (and where/when) has it frequently been challenged?  What might be ironic about wanting this book censored?  What is your reflection on reading the book – how might you oppose or defend a challenge to this book at our school?

Whichever option you choose, it must be submitted by the end of the week, Friday, September 30.  To be eligible, you must follow the requirements for each option, as well as aim for professional quality (Mom would put it on the fridge, and so would I!).  Successful efforts will be awarded 20pts, and above-average efforts 30pts (each option is worth more than a homework assignment!).  If nothing else, you can celebrate this week by finishing TKAM, and moving on to a new book which, having been published, probably has found someone to challenge it by now!

F(READ)OM!!

Courtesy @BannedBooksWeek on Twitter.

Courtesy @BannedBooksWeek on Twitter.

First Folio! – Felicitous Fall Fare

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The Shakespeare season is upon us!  Before you go further unto the breach, check out what I mean by visiting this 23rd of April post from this site:

The Wonder of Will

Still unsure what a Folio actually is?  Check it out!

Now that you know tthe readiness is all, are you ready for the Extra Credit?  (By “Extra Credit”, I mean one of the three options – a HW pass, points on a low-scored assignment, or an item from the Time and Space Box.)

It’s simple, by Jove – go see the exhibit!  That’s it.  Brush up your Shakespeare with a visit to the State Museum, and prove it with a selfie in the exhibit!

Your selfie must be in the exhibit, however!

Your selfie must be in the exhibit, however!

The Museum is located at 2301 Central Avenue in downtown Cheyenne (mind the road closures at 19th street).  The hours are 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday (Fridays and Saturdays are your best bet unless you’re on a field trip I should’ve been invited on, fustilarian!).  Admission is FREE!

There is also an opening night reception, featuring guest lecturer Professor Peter Parolin of UW’s English Dept. (one of the best classes I took there)!  This event is tonight (8th September) from 5-7 pm to see the folio, and the lecture runs from 7-8 pm.  So fair a day you shall not likely see, and you can get extra credit if I see you there!

So that’s it!  Check in with me for more info should you need it – better three hours too soon than a minute too late!

Book it!

Book it!

Back to School 2016!

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Can you believe it?!  Not much sense in thinking backwards now – so let’s go ahead and get started!  Here is the welcome back slideshow airing in the Back to School evening event.  Only those present will hear the soulful tunes and receive the wicked handouts, but all can be redeemed when school officially tarts next week.  See ya then!

 

April Playlist (2016)

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Charlie Chaplin and a Toe-Tapping Swing

Charlie Chaplin and a Toe-Tapping Swing

April (snow) showers bring new music!  This month’s themes: weather, generations, and perspectives of poetry.

  1. The Blues Brothers (Soundtrack) – She Caught the Katy
  2. Simon & Garfunkel – Cecilia
  3. Ivan & Alyosha – Running for Cover
  4. Jay & The Americans – Come a Little Bit Closer
  5. The Standells – Dirty Water
  6. Caro Emerald – Pack Up the Louie
  7. Spoon – The Underdog
  8. George Ezra – Budapest
  9. 10,000 Maniacs – Like the Weather
  10. They Might Be Giants – Birdhouse in Your Soul
  11. Kurt Vile – I’m an Outlaw
  12. Lucinda Williams – Lake Charles
  13. The Rolling Stones – Ruby Tuesday
  14. Mumford & Sons – Roll Away Your Stone
  15. The Perishers – Come Out of the Shade
  16. George Harrison – Got My Mind Set on You
  17. Queen – Hammer to Fall
  18. First Aid Kit – My Silver Lining
  19. Tomaso Albinoni (Remo Giazotto) – Adagio in G Minor
  20. Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band – My Lucky Day
  21. Warren Zevon – Mohammed’s Radio (Live)
  22. War Horse Soundtrack – The Scarlet and the Blue
  23. The Lumineers – Ophelia
  24. The White Stripes – My Doorbell
  25. Nina Simone – Feeling Good
  26. Stars – Your Ex-Lover is Dead
  27. KT Tunstall – One Day
  28. BØRNS – Electric Love
  29. Regina Spektor – Us
  30. Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Into the Great Wide Open
  31. Gerry & The Pacemakers – You’ll Never Walk Alone

Shakespeare Test on The Ides of March!

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Violent delights have violent ends!

Violent delights have violent ends!

This message is intended for the freshmen classes!  I wanted to share a few wonderful resources from a 3rd Hour Shakespeare’s World Research presentation today.  As you may remember, there is a veritable slew (slew!) of subjects included on Tuesday’s Ides Test.  These great four links help fill in general knowledge of Shakespeare’s life and works.

Here’s a link to a brief timeline of the life of Stratford’s most famous son:

http://www.earlyshakespeare.com/images/Timeline.pdf


 

 

This YouTube video takes a humorous look at introducing Shakespeare (make sure you stick around until the ironic, slow open is over):


 

Of course, here’s the Canadian Folio copy of the play:

http://www.canadianshakespeares.ca/folio/folio.html


 

And, because why not, more awesomeness relating to the Bard from a 2012 TEDxTalk:

The Readiness is All!

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