Tag: Holidays

Fisherman, Connemara, oil on canvas, Maurice Canning Wilks (1911-1984)

“The Fisherman” by W. B. Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Although I can see him still,
The freckled man who goes
To a grey place on a hill
In grey Connemara clothes
At dawn to cast his flies,
It’s long since I began
To call up to the eyes
This wise and simple man.
All day I’d looked in the face
What I had hoped ‘twould be
To write for my own race
And the reality;
The living men that I hate,
The dead man that I loved,
The craven man in his seat,
The insolent unreproved,
And no knave brought to book
Who has won a drunken cheer,
The witty man and his joke
Aimed at the commonest ear,
The clever man who cries
The catch-cries of the clown,
The beating down of the wise
And great Art beaten down.

Maybe a twelvemonth since
Suddenly I began,
In scorn of this audience,
Imagining a man,
And his sun-freckled face,
And grey Connemara cloth,
Climbing up to a place
Where stone is dark under froth,
And the down-turn of his wrist
When the flies drop in the stream;
A man who does not exist,
A man who is but a dream;
And cried, ‘Before I am old
I shall have written him one
Poem maybe as cold
And passionate as the dawn.’

 

Yeats: “Hammer your thoughts into unity”

12th Grade: European Literature 9th Grade: Intro to Literature Reading Picks

        Be’er preperred

Up in the Morning Early

Cauld blaws the wind frae east to west,
The drift is driving sairly;
Sae loud and shrill’s I hear the blast,
I’m sure it’s winter fairly.

Up in the morning’s no for me,
Up in the morning early;
When a’ the hills are cover’d wi’ snaw,
I’m sure its winter fairly.

The birds sit chittering in the thorn,
A’ day they fare but sparely;
And lang’s the night frae e’en to morn,
I’m sure it’s winter fairly.

Up in the morning’s no for me,
Up in the morning early;
When a’ the hills are cover’d wi’ snaw,
I’m sure its winter fairly.

– Robert Burns

        Dedication of the Robert Burns statue in Cheyenne, Wyoming, on November 11, 1929

12th Grade: European Literature Threads

Christmas Memories
Christmas Memories

The number one request in wishlists sent to Mr. Earnshaw’s North Pole Classroom Blog?  More videos from Bob’s Buskers (from Bob’s Burgers)!  So here you go – the National, a Christmas Tree, and a message we can all get behind.  Stay warm, students and friends; happy holidays!

Admin Threads

Thank you so much, students, who have already signed up for Remind and other digital class notifications.  Today would’ve been the first day of school, but the powers that be wisely moved it to the side so that the real show – Total Solar Eclipse! – can take center stage.  I’m looking forward to seeing all of you tomorrow, and many of you on today’s Eclipse field trip, to start the academic year!

Diagram of a solar eclipse from a 13th-century illuminated manuscript. The New York Public Library Digital Collections – via BrainPickings

Those of you on the bus today will have hours to be regaled with eclipse myths, like the frogs who swallow the stars, or passages from Annie Dillard’s classic essay on 1979’s offering, or even jam out to Mr. E’s favorite eclipse playlists.

Space.com has the broadest collection, in my opinion:

If you won’t be on our trip, please make an effort on your own to see what Mabel Loomis Todd observed as: “A vast, palpable presence overwhelming the world. The blue sky changes to gray or dull purple, speedily becoming more dusky, and a death-like trance seizes upon everything earthly.”

Grab those special, approved viewers’ glasses and maybe read up on some of the political and cultural impacts of this eclipse in a particularly dramatic moment in American history at The Atlantic.

You should make every effort to live in this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, what Emily Dickinson, who saw the eclipse in 1875, immortalized in the lines:

It sounded as if the streets were running —
And then — the streets stood still —
Eclipse was all we could see at the Window
And Awe — was all we could feel.

By and by — the boldest stole out of his Covert
To see if Time was there —
Nature was in her Opal Apron —
Mixing fresher Air.

Happy stargazing!

See you soon.

-Mr. E

Admin Field Trips Playlists Threads

Couldn’t have done it without you, pupils mine.

The height of summer is upon us, so I wanted to check in with a call to heed what days remain!  I suggest you follow my lead: fill the calendar with reads to recommend, be outdoors more than in, and hide from the afternoon heat in a cinema or siesta.  I’m looking forward to seeing you in August (after I’ve seen that eclipse!), but let’s not rush the pages by counting them.

cheerio!

Mr. E

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                Walt Whitman. Poets.org

“Poets to Come (Leaves of Grass.90)”

by Walt Whitman, (1819-1892)

Poets to come!  orators, singers, musicians to come!

Not to-day is to justify me and answer what I am for,

But you, a new brood, native, athletic, continental,

greater than before known,

Arouse!  for you must justify me!

I myself but write one or two indicative words for the

future,

I but advance a moment only to wheel and hurry back

in the darkness.

 

I am a man who, sauntering along without fully

stopping, turns a casual look upon you and then

averts his face,

Leaving it to you to prove and define it,

Expecting the main things from you.

#pocketpoem   #ThankYouNEA

Admin Class Resources

The annual Shakespeare commemoration (although, really, here’s it’s pretty much every day) is marked in this edition with a beautiful, sad song and a funny graphic adaptation of class favorite Romeo and Juliet.

From last year’s Shakespeare Live! from the Royal Shakespeare Company (aired on BBC), here is Gregory Porter singing “When that I was and a little tiny boy (With hey, ho, the wind and the rain)” from Twelfth Night, Act 5, Scene 1.

Shakespeare Live – Gregory Porter – The Wind and The Rain on Vimeo.

And, for lighter fare, Mya Gosling regularly creates comic adaptations, and interpretations, of Shakespeare and other goodness on the site Good Tickle Brain.

Among plenty of the frequently updated and fun Shakespearethere are three panel reviews of many plays, including those from our classes this year.  Ah, memories.

3panelhamlet


3panelmacbeth

3panelrj

12th Grade: European Literature 9th Grade: Intro to Literature Admin ENG2020: Concurrent Enrollment

This year, I hope to share with you a set of video traditions that have already taken a special place in the hearts of my family, as I’m sure they will in yours.  Of course, they are mostly about food, but be sure to set time aside for that family talking and activities kind of stuff.  There are only so many Thanksgivings.

Now back to food.  Eat it, even if you don’t like it.  Put it on your plate.  Thank you food bringers for caring enough to bring anything.  Bob’s Burgers says it best:

And it’s been covered by the National!

That turkey should not die in vain.

Maybe it’s the gravy that really sets your family Thanksgiving apart.  Bob’s Burgers and The National are here to help us again!

And if you’re still needing to satisfy your family’s quirkiness or willingness to try it all, go Ron Swanson.  If you’ve already satisfied yourself with “the Swanson” – a turkey leg wrapped in bacon – maybe try one of Nick Offerman’s home recipes:

Enjoy!  Best of luck today, tomorrow (for the bold fools who will Black Friday), and this weekend.  See you Monday!

Admin Threads

Banned Books Week 2015, courtesy ala.org/bbooks
Banned Books Week 2015, courtesy ala.org/bbooks

Every year, the last week in September becomes the focal point for a concerted effort to celebrate the freedom to read.  In this country, the First Amendment’s right to free speech must contend with a long history of censorship – promoted by individuals, organizations, and government.  Banned Books Week is organized by the American Library Association (ALA), the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), and a host of non-profits, publishers, and legal defense funds.  It is supported by myself, among much of the reading world, and, through this week’s Extra Credit opportunity, by you!

(Check out this cool infographic to learn more: courtesy of Electric Literature)

To receive Extra Credit for Banned Books Week, you must choose one of the following options, and use professional images, symbols, designs, or media:

A) Create a Poster to celebrate the week, using the three requirements below:

B) Create a Handout to share information about banned and challenged books, using these criteria:

  • A list of frequently challenged books (Here’s a resource from the ALA)
  • Reasons why books are often challenged (Resources from the Huffington Post, in 2012 and 2014)
  • A checklist of frequently challenged books – check off as many as you’ve read!

C) Compose a 1 page essay (typed – 12pt font, TNR, double-spaced) on To Kill a Mockingbird as a challenged book.  Why (and where/when) has it frequently been challenged?  What might be ironic about wanting this book censored?  What is your reflection on reading the book – how might you oppose or defend a challenge to this book at our school?

Whichever option you choose, it must be submitted by the end of the week, Friday, September 30.  To be eligible, you must follow the requirements for each option, as well as aim for professional quality (Mom would put it on the fridge, and so would I!).  Successful efforts will be awarded 20pts, and above-average efforts 30pts (each option is worth more than a homework assignment!).  If nothing else, you can celebrate this week by finishing TKAM, and moving on to a new book which, having been published, probably has found someone to challenge it by now!

F(READ)OM!!

Courtesy @BannedBooksWeek on Twitter.
Courtesy @BannedBooksWeek on Twitter.

Admin Class Resources Reading Picks

How summer goes in my dreams (vision of import at courtesy of Toho and Dr. Pepper).

That’s all folks!  Another school year complete, I want to thank you for the advice, participation, suggestions, and giggles you gave me in and out of class in this site’s debut.  Feel free to check in this summer, as I’ll post the occasional snapshot of my life during break.  Plenty to look forward to in the fall – great reading, Google Classroom, new “district assessments”, and another chance for the best school year ever – but for now, I’m satisfied to sit back and summer it up.  Hope you do the same!  Stay safe, be good.  See ya ’round!   – Mr. E

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