Tag: Introductions

Can you believe it?!  Not much sense in thinking backwards now – so let’s go ahead and get started!  Here is the welcome back slideshow that would normally air in the Back to School evening event.  I will be absent this go ’round, attending an audition for Jeopardy! in Denver, which will hopefully look something nothing like this:

via GIPHY

In lieu of the in-person slideshow, here is a digital copy.  For syllabi, Remind flyers, and other info, head into the Class Resources tabs featured along the bar at the top.

Thanks for visiting, and happy school year!

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Mastery (of English. Next – Lumberjackin’!)

Welcome back!  Fresh from Flagstaff with a measure of professional fulfillment, inspiration has struck to makeover the page.  Special kudos to the webmaster-wife in this effort!  Sorry to those of you who struggle with shifting (and shifty) internets.

Please continue to use the site as you normally would – Odyssey posts are directly below, and past Remind messages are now accessed through the tabs at the top.  Off to Ithaca!

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Violent delights have violent ends!
Violent delights have violent ends!

Romeo and Juliet is finally here!  I wanted to share a few wonderful resources to keep you on track during our reading, including a few winners from last year’s Shakespeare’s World Research presentations (hint hint).  As you may remember, there is a veritable slew (slew!) of information to keep track of.  It’s all worth it though!  Remember, we don’t agree with Plato – art isn’t useless!  Look at what Lady Gaga pulled off in yesterday’s Super Bowl:

Theatrical skills can really pay off later!  These great four links help fill in general knowledge of Shakespeare’s life and works.  Also, although it’s a little early to be thinking about it, you can expect some potential Unit Test items below…

Here’s a link to a brief timeline of the life of Stratford’s most famous son:

http://www.earlyshakespeare.com/images/Timeline.pdf


This YouTube video takes a humorous look at introducing Shakespeare (make sure you stick around until the ironic, slow open is over):


Of course, here’s the Canadian Folio copy of the play we use in class:

http://www.canadianshakespeares.ca/folio/folio.html


And, because why not, more awesomeness relating to the Bard from a 2012 TEDxTalk:

The Readiness is All!

9th Grade: Intro to Literature Class Resources

A new week, a new unit!  Now, I know all of you loved Macbeth ever so much (almost at dashing-brains-on-the-floor levels), but it’s time to move into our needlessly overpacked third unit — the Enlightenment, Restoration, and Romantic Eras in 6 weeks or less!

As promised, I have included today’s content-opening overview so that you may review the years, terms, and personalities that you might explore in your Unit Projects.

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Huzzah!

12th Grade: European Literature Class Resources

Can you believe it?!  Not much sense in thinking backwards now – so let’s go ahead and get started!  Here is the welcome back slideshow airing in the Back to School evening event.  Only those present will hear the soulful tunes and receive the wicked handouts, but all can be redeemed when school officially tarts next week.  See ya then!

 

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Women are awesome!  Some people aren’t aware, apparently.  That’s why March is designated Women’s History Month.  It wouldn’t be a bad thing at all if someday we can collectively remember that history has been made by women, too – so you can do your part by checking out the titles below!

The Princess and the Pony. Kate Beaton. Arthur A. Levine Books. 2015.
The Princess and the Pony. Kate Beaton. Arthur A. Levine Books. 2015.

Kate Beaton is the magnificent wit behind the webcomic series Hark! A Vagrant, which has been printed in a few best-selling books (and also isn’t appropriate for all ages, especially because some killjoys detest constant giggling).  The Princess and the Pony, great for kids and adults, tells the story of Princess Pinecone, who wants a noble warhorse to ride into Viking-style violence.  For her birthday she gets instead a flatulent, rotund pony.  What happens next is funny and feminist.  Available from Scholastic Book Orders for $4!

Rad American Women A-Z. Kate Schatz & Miriam Klein Stahl. City Lights. 2015.
Rad American Women A-Z. Kate Schatz & Miriam Klein Stahl. City Lights. 2015.

Revolution begins at home!  America may be relatively young on the world stage, but its women have radically changed history.  The 26 women profiled in this book represent science, entertainment, athletics, innovation, exploration – basically all the walks of life that make our country what it is.  Kate Schatz writes the profiles, and Miriam Klein Stahl provides each illustration.  Available from Scholastic for $7, this pocket-sized guide is perfect for bite-sized, yet larger-than-life, world-widening.

Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science - and the World. Rachel Swaby. Broadway Books. 2015.
Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science – and the World. Rachel Swaby. Broadway Books. 2015.

Rachel Swaby was inspired to write this informative, invigorating collection of women inventors, scientists, and explorers after seeing too many get short shrift in their obituaries.  Ada Lovelace, Lord Byron’s daughter and – more importantly – the world’s first computer programmer (in the 1840s!), is included.  As is Hedy Lamarr, scintillating movie star and also pioneer in radar technology.  And those are just the most famous faces.  This book captures the sentiment of the women’s history movement succinctly: the stories have been there all along, but someone *forgot* to tell the whole truth.  We owe it to ourselves to fix that.  Read well – it’s the best provision for changing your life.

Reading Picks Threads

12th Grade: European Literature 9th Grade: Intro to Literature Admin Class Resources

I’m Justin Earnshaw, a teacher of English. This blog is intended to serve as a resource for my students, as well as an online venue to begin establishing a digital presence. As a relative neophyte to the digital realm, this is a learning experience for me, and perhaps one for you, dear reader.

Things you can expect to see on this blog:

  • Messages for students (to discuss, inform, and motivate, etc.).
  • Connections to literary texts of the world (e.g. book reviews, links to excellent essays, geeking out over movie trailers).
  • Noticings about this corner of the world — southeast Wyoming and the front range corridor.

Things you should not expect to see on this blog:

  • Vitriol, vehemence, and other vile things found on the web’s dark(er) corners (such as hate speech, trolling, New York Yankees fans).
  • Detailed elements of my personal life – students will not know where I live or where my gold is buried.
  • An easy, how-to guide to doing it all the right way. This is simply my view on matters pertaining to the best possible worldly and academic education for my students.

Thanks for reading this, and now get back to reading that book!

MrE

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