Tag Archives: Map Lover

12th – Invitations into Victorian Era Culture!

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Welcome back students!  Distract yourself from the hazardous, wintry roads with some travels in time-and-space!

Your adventures ask you to follow the invitation drawn in class, and then head to the suggested sites to learn all you can about that aspect of Victorian Life.

The two sites recommended for each invitation come to us from dedicated professionals and amateurs alike.

The first is a major authority – the British Library’s Romantic and Victorian collection: https://www.bl.uk/romantics-and-victorians

If you could be trusted to self-motivate, this  site would be your teacher.

If you could be trusted to self-motivate, this site would be your teacher.

The second demonstrates the collective scholastic innovation of dedicated lovers of lit: the Victorian Web: http://www.victorianweb.org/

The Web will be significant in Great Expectations, not least of which in building expectations that are great.

The Web will be significant in Great Expectations, not least of which in building expectations that are great.

The other sites, based upon your subject, could include:

the BALL:

https://janeaustensworld.wordpress.com/

the NATURE WALK:

https://vqronline.org/nature-loving-victorians

the ANATOMY LECTURE:

http://www.pbs.org/opb/historydetectives/feature/body-snatching-around-the-world/

the COURT:

http://vcp/e2bn.org/justice/

the GOVERNESS:

http://web.utk.edu/~gerard/romanticpolitics/governess.html

the GRAND TOUR:

https://janeaustensworld.wordpress.com/2008/04/14/the-grand-tour-in-the-18th-19th-century/

the NEWSPAPER:

http://find.galegroup.com/bncn/BNCN_researchguide.htm

the CARRIAGE:

https://www.ourcivilisation.com/smartboard/shop/bynpwllr/coaches2.htm

9th – City Dionysia WebQuest

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Dream job - making high-quality educational websites.  Also, having likeness preserved on a jar.

Dream job – making high-quality educational websites. Also, having likeness preserved on a jar.

Freshmen!  Welcome to theater.  We begin this week in, er, the Beginning!  The Ancient Greeks are credited with the invention of modern theater, and you are learning all about ’em this week through the City Dionysia packet.  To complete the prompts, visit the most excellent resource of ARTSEDGE, the Education in Arts wing of the Kennedy Center.

Visit the site, which opens up in your first section: Prologue.

http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/interactives/greece/theater/prologue.html

Due at the end of the week, this is your first chance in Semester 2 to earn KLEOS – TO GLORY!

Mr. E is Missing! (Kind of.) Updates from the Faraway.

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It’s mid-October again!  Time to repost some “Magicke Moste Foule”.  Sadly, I won’t be with you in this most wonderful week – what with 9th graders contending with wolves, Brit. Lit. finishing their pilgrimage to Canterbury, and the 1010 peeps playing Devil’s Advocate – out am I making conferencing!  Just because I can’t be with you doesn’t mean I’m not here to help.  All week, I will send you updates from my conference, and give you an opportunity to check in with me about assignments and other nonesuch.  Be good to your sub, and check in every day for bonus items and reminders.

It’s the season of suspenseful storytelling, with an emphasis on imaginative yarns and wanderings through folklore.  Here are some of the resources from class, by your request, that captured through digital wizardry (a most mysterious magic) the senses, tales, and spine-tingling thrills of the school year in October.

9th – Intro to Literature: This week, you’ve got suspenseful wolf texts to read and watch.  All worksheets and reading notes will be due at the end of class Thursday.  Today it’s “The Interlopers” – if you don’t finish in class, you can find the story online or pick up a print copy in the classroom.  Also, because it’s the song you can’t escape from, no matter how far the river takes you, here’s “The Bottom of the River” by Delta Rae.  Look for the wolves in the lyrics!

Perhaps one of the greatest music videos out there, not least of which in the terrible joy of ambiguity.

 

Brit. Lit:  You’re finishing Unit 1 this week, with an emphasis on what this unit does for our class.  Why study Early and Middle English?  Answer this question with your impressive project, due Thursday.  In today’s class you met Death – don’t incur another visit by turning in that project late!  Remember: project reflective essay, rubric.  All due Thursday!

For those of you looking for more Chaucer inspiration, here’s “The Canterbury Tales: Part I”, from Christmas Films, Pizzazz Pictures, and Right Angle.

These episodes aired on the BBC in 1998-2000, excerpting highlights from Chaucer with inventive animation swings.  Not for the faint-hearted or tidy-minded, but then, a lot of the fun stuff from different historical eras isn’t.

Part II: https://youtu.be/9i97vbwSSMM

Part III: https://youtu.be/4pG5G45m6dg

 

ENGL 1010: Oh, my eggheaded darlings.  I haven’t forgotten you.  If you think I have, let’s play Devil’s Advocate about it!  That’s your goal this week, and to help you poke holes in arguments you don’t like, we won’t just shout “WRONG!” or console ourselves with “That’s your opinion”.  Get logical!  Here’s the link to our favorite Book of Bad Arguments.  Sometimes the best way to be right is simply being less wrong – point out those fallacies in your content this week!

https://bookofbadarguments.com/

by Ali Almossawi!

by Ali Almossawi, who made it FREE on the web!

Tomorrow I’ll send you an update from the AECT in fabulous Las Vegas, Nevada.  Teachers don’t have it all bad, I suppose.  Now, get to work!

Happy Summer!

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How summer goes in my dreams (vision of import at courtesy of Toho and Dr. Pepper).

That’s all folks!  Another school year complete, I want to thank you for the advice, participation, suggestions, and giggles you gave me in and out of class in this site’s debut.  Feel free to check in this summer, as I’ll post the occasional snapshot of my life during break.  Plenty to look forward to in the fall – great reading, Google Classroom, new “district assessments”, and another chance for the best school year ever – but for now, I’m satisfied to sit back and summer it up.  Hope you do the same!  Stay safe, be good.  See ya ’round!   – Mr. E

Mapping the Homeric World

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Image from Eclectic/Eccentric.

Image from Eclectic/Eccentric.

The Odyssey is one of earliest, and best, works in the “big trip” genre, so grand they named half the genre after it!  For freshmen looking to complete a 3D Map for their Odyssey project, here are a few tips.

First – the in-class map is by no means definitive, but has two components that I think are key: an oversized Ithaca and an Underworld far (far) to the west.  You don’t have to reach the Pillars of Heracles, but I like the idea of going to the edge of the known (Mediterranean) world.

Second – use your resources to help you tell the story!  Some of my favorites are on Google Earth (download it if you haven’t – it’s worth it!), especially the Odyssey on Google Lit Trips, which features facts and artwork at the locations in each episode.  Your map doesn’t need to be overly complicated, but consider adding stickers, flags, or figures to keep the travels alive.

Third – you don’t need to use salt dough, but this is a straightforward method to make your map 3D that is both easy and useful!  The video below was made in jazzy style by a very good friend of mine some years ago, and gives you a nice breakdown of the salt dough process.  I definitely expect your map to be in color, so grab the appropriate food coloring to go with it or paint it after it dries (a few days later)!

For Glory!

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