Tag: Poetry

Looking down on her favorite mortal
Looking down with muse in ‘er eye

Odyssey season is upon us!  Unless you too want to wander around the rocky islands of 9th Grade trying to get home, you would do well to heed our Olympian decree to keep up with the readings and get that final project done.

For the (24!) books of the epic, you have plenty of resources in getting the gist of the plot so you can focus more on our essential questions and archetypes.  So, as the grey-eyed one provided Odysseus the tools he needed to be successful, this post is Part I of our mission to get you out of here in one, sophomoric, piece.

Besides the class books and graphic novels/comics, check out these links to get your Mentor on!

Traditional guides: the safety net of Sparknotes and the too-cool-for-school ethos of Shmoop (which has some funny infographics peppered throughout, and way too many popups…)

I ain't saying that they're bronzediggers...
I ain’t saying that they’re bronzediggers…

Full-text versions of the epic: including Ian Johnston’s recent translation out of Vancouver Island University, and two prose translations, old (A.T. Murray) and older (Samuel Butler).

Anyone seen that mortal I was tormenting? Oh well - plenty to choose from.
Anyone seen that mortal I was tormenting? Oh well –
plenty to choose from.

And some really interesting new-media options: including some open/ed. designs from our community of Padlet (this one’s Verity Webster’s) and a fascinating, and highly distracting, clickable offering from Emery University’s Carlos Museum.  Clicking on the Greece tab will take you to the interactive site (Flash required).

It will prove itself even to you doubters.
It will prove itself even to you doubters.

Of course, we have the in-class options, but the Odyssey is one of the biggest stories ever told!  You should journey onto the kool-aid seas of the internet to get the best version for you.

KLEOS/NOSTOS!

9th Grade: Intro to Literature Class Resources

                Walt Whitman. Poets.org

“Poets to Come (Leaves of Grass.90)”

by Walt Whitman, (1819-1892)

Poets to come!  orators, singers, musicians to come!

Not to-day is to justify me and answer what I am for,

But you, a new brood, native, athletic, continental,

greater than before known,

Arouse!  for you must justify me!

I myself but write one or two indicative words for the

future,

I but advance a moment only to wheel and hurry back

in the darkness.

 

I am a man who, sauntering along without fully

stopping, turns a casual look upon you and then

averts his face,

Leaving it to you to prove and define it,

Expecting the main things from you.

#pocketpoem   #ThankYouNEA

Admin Class Resources

The annual Shakespeare commemoration (although, really, here’s it’s pretty much every day) is marked in this edition with a beautiful, sad song and a funny graphic adaptation of class favorite Romeo and Juliet.

From last year’s Shakespeare Live! from the Royal Shakespeare Company (aired on BBC), here is Gregory Porter singing “When that I was and a little tiny boy (With hey, ho, the wind and the rain)” from Twelfth Night, Act 5, Scene 1.

Shakespeare Live – Gregory Porter – The Wind and The Rain on Vimeo.

And, for lighter fare, Mya Gosling regularly creates comic adaptations, and interpretations, of Shakespeare and other goodness on the site Good Tickle Brain.

Among plenty of the frequently updated and fun Shakespearethere are three panel reviews of many plays, including those from our classes this year.  Ah, memories.

3panelhamlet


3panelmacbeth

3panelrj

12th Grade: European Literature 9th Grade: Intro to Literature Admin ENG2020: Concurrent Enrollment

Kitchener, from: 'Your country needs you' advertisement in London Opinion, Vol. XLII No.546, 5 September 1914. British Library.
Kitchener, from: ‘Your country needs you’ advertisement in London Opinion, Vol. XLII No.546, 5 September 1914. British Library.

The following links are for the 1st and 4th Hour British Literature classes, but anyone should feel free to follow them to education (or emptiness).  It may be said that no retelling can ever truly capture the horrors and mindset of warfare.  But artists and authors have to try – sometimes only poetry or paint can communicate the senses and worst fears made real.

WNB#1/2 URLs:

World War Pictures hosts a variety of visual media pertaining to the conflicts: http://www.world-war-pictures.com/

The British Library, again, gives us great multimedia and perspectives on our class content.  The first link, on propaganda, should be used to answer prompt 13.  The second link is extra reading, if you are looking for more perspective on the poems for your posters.

http://www.bl.uk/world-war-one/themes/propaganda

http://www.bl.uk/world-war-one/articles/reframing-first-world-war-poetry 

If you are curious, you could also follow-up with two perspectives on the ubiquity of the “Keep Calm and Carry On” slogan, by Dr. Henry Irving and Owen Hatherley, respectively.

The US National Archives has a YouTube playlist of war films from 100 years ago:

Finally (because why not), here is a trench game from the UK’s National Archives.

Hurrah for the Scarlet and the Blue, and may we never again find ourselves in a war to end all wars.

12th Grade: European Literature Class Resources Threads

Dream job - making high-quality educational websites.  Also, having likeness preserved on a jar.
Dream job – making high-quality educational websites. Also, having likeness preserved on a jar.

Freshmen!  Welcome to theater.  We begin this week in, er, the Beginning!  The Ancient Greeks are credited with the invention of modern theater, and you are learning all about ’em this week through the City Dionysia packet.  To complete the prompts, visit the most excellent resource of ARTSEDGE, the Education in Arts wing of the Kennedy Center.

Visit the site, which opens up in your first section: Prologue.

http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/interactives/greece/theater/prologue.html

Due at the end of the week, this is your first chance in Semester 2 to earn KLEOS – TO GLORY!

9th Grade: Intro to Literature Class Resources

She shall be Rose the Destroyer!

May this be your month!  To keep the classroom humming productively for the next four long weeks, this month’s playlist is a nice mix of thumpin’ seasonal picks, an Odyssey-themed setlist, and a summer concert series that I’m personally looking forward to.  What will you do this month to make summer worth the wait?

  1. Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – The Waiting
  2. Rihanna feat. Jay-Z – Umbrella
  3. OMC – How Bizarre
  4. Tori Kelly – Nobody Love
  5. Summer Camp – Down
  6. Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band – Darlington County
  7. The Kingsmen – Louie Louie
  8. Nashville Cast – The Book
  9. Dawes – From a Window Seat
  10. Shiny Toy Guns – Earth Below Us
  11. Christodoulos Halaris – Hymn to the Muse (Trad.)
  12. David Bowie – Heroes
  13. The Lively Ones – Surf Rider
  14. AWOLNATION – Sail
  15. Mumford & Sons – The Cave
  16. The Alarm – The Stand
  17. The Pretty Reckless – Heaven Knows
  18. The Strumbellas – Spirits
  19. Leon Bridges – Smooth Sailin’
  20. Chet Faker – Gold
  21. Adele – Water Under the Bridge
  22. Alison Krauss & Gillian Welch (O Brother, Where Art Thou? Soundtrack) – I’ll Fly Away
  23. Tom Waits – Long Way Home
  24. M83 – Midnight City
  25. The Avett Brothers – Live and Die
  26. Nahko and the Medicine for the People – San Quentin
  27. Gary Clark Jr. – When My Train Pulls In
  28. Trampled By Turtles – Come Back Home
  29. Lord Huron – The Man Who Lives Forever
  30. Shakira feat. Wyclef Jean – Hips Don’t Lie
  31. The Wallflowers – One Headlight

Admin Playlists

Edna St. Vincent Millay. Photo credit: Carl Van Vechten. Poets.org
Edna St. Vincent Millay. Photo credit: Carl Van Vechten. Poets.org

“Travel”

by Edna St. Vincent Millay, (1892-1950)

The railroad track is miles away,

    And the day is loud with voices speaking,

Yet there isn’t a train goes by all day

    But I hear its whistle shrieking.

 

All night there isn’t a train goes by,

    Though the night is still for sleep and dreaming,

But I see its cinders red on the sky,

    And hear its engine steaming.

 

My heart is warm with friends I make,

    And better friends I’ll not be knowing;

Yet there isn’t a train I wouldn’t take,

    No matter where it’s going.

#pocketpoem

Admin Class Resources

Charlie Chaplin and a Toe-Tapping Swing
Charlie Chaplin and a Toe-Tapping Swing

April (snow) showers bring new music!  This month’s themes: weather, generations, and perspectives of poetry.

  1. The Blues Brothers (Soundtrack) – She Caught the Katy
  2. Simon & Garfunkel – Cecilia
  3. Ivan & Alyosha – Running for Cover
  4. Jay & The Americans – Come a Little Bit Closer
  5. The Standells – Dirty Water
  6. Caro Emerald – Pack Up the Louie
  7. Spoon – The Underdog
  8. George Ezra – Budapest
  9. 10,000 Maniacs – Like the Weather
  10. They Might Be Giants – Birdhouse in Your Soul
  11. Kurt Vile – I’m an Outlaw
  12. Lucinda Williams – Lake Charles
  13. The Rolling Stones – Ruby Tuesday
  14. Mumford & Sons – Roll Away Your Stone
  15. The Perishers – Come Out of the Shade
  16. George Harrison – Got My Mind Set on You
  17. Queen – Hammer to Fall
  18. First Aid Kit – My Silver Lining
  19. Tomaso Albinoni (Remo Giazotto) – Adagio in G Minor
  20. Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band – My Lucky Day
  21. Warren Zevon – Mohammed’s Radio (Live)
  22. War Horse Soundtrack – The Scarlet and the Blue
  23. The Lumineers – Ophelia
  24. The White Stripes – My Doorbell
  25. Nina Simone – Feeling Good
  26. Stars – Your Ex-Lover is Dead
  27. KT Tunstall – One Day
  28. BØRNS – Electric Love
  29. Regina Spektor – Us
  30. Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Into the Great Wide Open
  31. Gerry & The Pacemakers – You’ll Never Walk Alone

Playlists