Tag: Villainy

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Mastery (of English. Next – Lumberjackin’!)

Welcome back!  Fresh from Flagstaff with a measure of professional fulfillment, inspiration has struck to makeover the page.  Special kudos to the webmaster-wife in this effort!  Sorry to those of you who struggle with shifting (and shifty) internets.

Please continue to use the site as you normally would – Odyssey posts are directly below, and past Remind messages are now accessed through the tabs at the top.  Off to Ithaca!

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Southeast Wyoming hasn't changed much since then...
Southeast Wyoming hasn’t changed much since then…

Hope the no-wifi game isn’t the only thing to keep you entertained over your unexpected break!  If internet has been restored (which I am assuming to be true, as you are reading this post…), be sure to e-mail me any missing assignments – SWRPapers, Unit 5 Reflective Essays, Annotated Bibliographies – because the 3rd Quarter is over!  All grades are final on Tuesday.  If I don’t have it then, there’s not much I can do.

For more fun and games, why don’t you check out this sweet game my wife made for one of her classes.  It serves as Shakespeare Connections/Exploration Amazingness!  No extra credit is being offered as of yet, but maybe you can earn a “Super Awesome” Prize if you solve the puzzle!

sploder

http://www.sploder.com/?s=d004w1ct

Admin Class Resources

It may not be easy, but it's keen to be green.
It may not be easy, but it’s keen to be green.

Spring may be around the corner, or maybe there’s another big winter storm on the way.  At least we know we’ll always have the wind!  Wind up with these tunes – some oldies, some goodies, and a crew of Celtic crush.

  1. Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Learning to Fly
  2. Traditional – Tim Finnegan’s Wake
  3. Adele – Rumour Has It
  4. Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band – Death to My Hometown
  5. Jack White – I’m Shakin’
  6. The Head and the Heart – Shake
  7. Máire Brennan – Against the Wind
  8. Mumford & Sons – Hopeless Wanderer
  9. Brigham Phillips – Will Ye Go Lassie Go
  10. Talking Heads – Wild Wild Life
  11. Jessie Ware – Wildest Moments
  12. Hal Ketchum – Past the Point of Rescue
  13. Evan Dando – Hard Drive
  14. U2 – Sunday Bloody Sunday
  15. Green Day feat. U2 – The Saints Are Coming
  16. Van Morrison – Brown Eyed Girl
  17. Traditional – The Jolly Beggar
  18. Will Millar – The Wild Galway Races
  19. The Fratellis – Flathead
  20. Dropkick Murphys – Fields of Athenry
  21. Natalie Merchant – Nursery Rhyme of Innocence and Experience
  22. Gheorghe Zamfir – The Lonely Shepherd
  23. Men at Work – I Come From a Land Down Under
  24. Tegan and Sara – Where Does the Good Go
  25. Frank Turner – Recovery
  26. The Hooters – And We Danced
  27. The Killers – All These Things That I’ve Done
  28. The Black Keys – Little Black Submarines
  29. The Rolling Stones – Wild Horses
  30. War Horse Soundtrack – Learning to Plough
  31. Dropkick Murphys feat. Bruce Springsteen – Peg O’ My Heart

Playlists

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.  Seth Grahame-Smith.  Quirk Classics.  2009.
Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Seth Grahame-Smith. Quirk Classics. 2009.

Ah, February.  For many, the month brings to mind snowdrifts, Valentines, and the peculiarity of a short month made a little longer every four years.  But for others, February is about a different kind of romance – the marriage of classic literature and “ultraviolent zombie mayhem”. To wit, 2013 offered Warm Bodies, a film – based on a book – based on Romeo and Juliet (plus zombies).  This Friday marks the release of an undead, overdue film – based on a book – that may have started it all: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.  While the film itself should be a delight (for those who like proper English ladies unsheathing decapitations upon dreadful Satan-spawn), the source material is not to be missed either.

Written by Seth Grahame-Smith (who also penned Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter), this novel comes from one of my favorite publishers Quirk Books, purveyor of all things interesting, literary, and, well, quirky (see: William Shakespeare’s Star WarsMiss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, and Horrorstör, to name a few).  Although eminently readable for its funniness and formally choreographed carnage, the genius behind PPZ is its authenticity in tone to Jane Austen’s 1813 original.  The manners and style that so occupy the Bennet sisters are retained, only now the ladies must sharpen swords and their martial arts skills in addition to proper dance form and social etiquette.  Also, the addition of “the dreadfuls” may clarify, for modern readers, some of the context and inferred elements of the novel, adding an undead focus.

p. 15 - "Mr. Darcy watched Elizabeth and her sisters work their way outward, beheading zombie after zombie as they went."  Illustrations by Philip Smiley.
p. 15 – “Mr. Darcy watched Elizabeth and her sisters work their way outward, beheading zombie after zombie as they went.” Illustrations by Philip Smiley.

The zombie trend, in my opinion, may have largely run its course.  Walking undead, such as vampires and zombies, aren’t really my thing, at least.  However, there is an undeniable appeal in the zeitgeist in imagining an endless horde of mindless consumers slowly, but surely, eroding the fabric of society.  Perhaps it was the same in Regency England!  If you can’t beat ’em, eat ’em…er, join ’em.  For Brit. Lit. students, please consider PPZ as an option for the Unit 4 novels (or seek out sequels and spinoffs such as Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters or Android Karenina). There may also be an extra credit opportunity for using the movie as an excuse to get literary – as if you needed one!

Monsters Reading Picks

I’m trying to keep this site focused on cool class content and notices, and I certainly don’t want to come across as a braggart here.  Enough people, however, have asked me about my Golden Apple Award that I figured I would put it up for those interested.  You should definitely check out all of the amazing educators who make a difference in our community at http://www.kgwn.tv/station/misc/Golden-Apple-Winners-248244001.html, but here is the video of one schmuck who snuck in.  Special thanks and credit to all of 7th Hour seniors who provided such nice bribes thoughts, as well as the wonderful wife who helps me get tech-y with videos and nonesuch.


PS – Special thanks to Jace’s hat, too.  That hat.

Admin ENG1010: Concurrent Enrollment

Open at the DMNS until the end of January
Open at the DMNS until the end of January

http://www.dmns.org/the-international-exhibition-of-sherlock-holmes/

“The Game is Afoot!” – as you will be reminded every ten minutes or so in your exploration of the latest traveling exhibit to hit the Denver Museum of Nature and Science.  I had the privilege to visit on Halloween this year, and will do my best to sell this experience briefly and with only the facts.  It’s the sequel to Power of Poisonwith an added, overt literary connection.  What’s more, this exhibit also is quite hands-on, with enough diversity for any visitor.  So read on, dear traveler, for the evidence of a great adventure and fabulous rewards with Arthur Conan Doyle’s legendary detective!

Welcome to Sherlock's London!
Welcome to Sherlock’s London!

This is a ticketed exhibit, meaning there is an extra fee besides admission as well as a certain time-slot you are to attend within.  Taking up a sprawling space within this incredible building, the Sherlock Holmes exhibit is cross-curricular, diabolical delight.  Literary history and influence, forensics and the influential experiments of Victorian science, pop culture studies, and hands-on experimentation are all wrapped up in good, old-fashioned mystery.  Each guest gets a notebook to record their observations, learning more about the culture and social strata of Victorian London along the way.  The notebook itself is packed with clues and winking allusions to the great detective.

Every detective needs a notebook
Every detective needs a notebook!

The first section is literary, filled with interesting artifacts and media covering inspiration and influence – including Poe, serial publication, high profile murder, and the emblematic energies of the British Empire at its height.  Following this area, searchers find themselves in a reproduction of 221 B Baker Street.  Here, details and easter eggs from the many cases of Holmes and Watson are hidden throughout.  The next room holds the highlight for many visitors – the case study.  Investigators are asked, by Holmes, to help solve a mystery involving five deductive/inductive exercises – hands-on stations pertaining to the bullet, the seed, the footprints, the newspaper, and the suspicion of murder.  You may occasionally be harassed helped by overzealous  museum guides – some dressed in Victorian personas – trying to move the investigation along.  To avoid some of the crowds, arriving early is a must, and you might have more space to your own sleuthing without considerate peeping by that most troublesome occurrence – other people.

Staying one step ahead...
Staying one step ahead…

Following your (hopefully) accurate conclusions, the mystery is solved and visitors get one last peek at their favorite incarnations of Holmes, from Basil Rathbone and The Great Mouse Detective to Downey Jr., Cumberbatch, and Lucy Liu’s Watson.  The gift shop is also quite inviting, but you might check with me to see what I already purchased so you won’t have to (basically the whole store).  There are, of course, great sales-pitches here for any of your teachers’ field trip needs, but if unable to go as a class you have until the end of January to make your own visit.  There is also a teens-only event on November 21st: Sherlockian Clue: Museum Edition.  Extra credit will rain down upon you after any visit (and maybe a project grade for the BritLit seniors), but especially for anyone who can attend this special event.  In summary, this is definitely one of the coolest exhibits to ever reach our area, and you can revisit Power of Poison while you’re there!  Investigate Sherlock before it vanishes into the fog of the gaslamps.  Elementary, indeed.

The Continuing Adventures
The Continuing Adventures

Field Trips Uncategorized

DeltaRae

It’s the season of suspenseful storytelling, with an emphasis on imaginative yarns and wanderings through folklore.  Here are some of the videos from class, by your request, that captured through digital wizardry (a most mysterious magic) the senses, tales, and spine-tingling thrills of the school year in October.

Intro to Literature: “The Bottom of the River” by Delta Rae

The song you can’t escape from, no matter how far the river takes you.  Perhaps one of the greatest music videos out there, not least of which in the terrible joy of ambiguity.

Brit. Lit – The Middle Ages: “The Canterbury Tales: Part I”, from Christmas Films, Pizzazz Pictures, and Right Angle.

These episodes aired on the BBC in 1998-2000, excerpting highlights from Chaucer with inventive animation swings.  Not for the faint-hearted or tidy-minded, but then, a lot of the fun stuff from different historical eras isn’t.

Part II: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ep6tvT3NQ_o

Part III: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCq6117mYqg

 

ENGL 1010: Facundo the Great! from StoryCorps

The now-epic story of a stand-up guy who made room for others to stand up.  Keep checking out the StoryCorps animated features and other site items.  The Great Thanksgiving Listen is coming up soon! https://storycorps.me/about/the-great-thanksgiving-listen/

Thanks for reading/watching.  Now, get to work!

12th Grade: European Literature 9th Grade: Intro to Literature Class Resources ENG1010: Concurrent Enrollment Threads

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